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Addiction Blog

Our addiction blog features articles on various drug and alcohol topics relating to detox and what to do during detox.

Top 10 Hardest Drugs to Quit

Drugs and alcohol are addictive. They make us feel good and this feeling of euphoria, relaxation or relief causes many people to continue to use them. Who doesn’t want to walk through life a little easier? Then there is the whole physical makeup of substances, and that physical make up catches many people off guard. See, many drugs and even alcohol don’t read on their label that they are physically addictive, that eventually it doesn’t matter how bad you want to stop, it is going to be physical painful to do so. Drugs and alcohol suck like that. So want to know what you are up against? How bad you might have it or did have it? We are ranking these substances on a mixture of how addictive they are and how severe the withdrawal from them are. So if a drug seems to be ranked higher than another that has severe withdrawal it is because it is much more addicting. Here Are the Top 10 Hardest Drugs to Quit 1. Nicotine Sorry but this one had to come first. It isn’t an illegal drug; it might not kill you quickly but come on people. Even if you aren’t doing hard drugs, chances are if you are still doing any substance at all, it is this one. And there is a reason for that. And it probably doesn’t have to do with a choice. Nicotine is highly addictive and the withdrawal symptoms are pretty crappy. The reason? Nicotine takes you up, up, up while you’re smoking. And then as soon as you finish that cigarette, the balloon pops and...

Five Common Excuses Addicts Use To Skip Treatment

Family and friends usually are trying to do what’s best for the addicts and alcoholics in their lives. Often times it is hard for them to do so because the addicts have a slew of excuses as to why they don’t need help or as to why they don’t need to go to rehab. They think that their excuse is valid, that the job, relationship, apartment, parents, or even dog really matter but in all reality they aren’t ready to get clean. The disease of addiction is tricky like that. That is why parents and friends should be familiar with the biggest excuses not to get help. Why? Because an addict will talk themselves out of getting help straight into their grave until someone does something to help them and doesn’t allow excuses. Here are 5 excuses not to go to rehab that you will always hear: “But, I will lose my job.” This is a great excuse and this would probably work if you were talking to someone who didn’t understand addiction. The truth is, you are going to end up losing your job regardless if you keep getting high. Trust us on this one because it always gets worse never better. “What about my girlfriend/boyfriend? I can’t leave him/her.” Yes you can. If you are getting high with him or her chances are you aren’t in exactly the healthiest relationship to begin with. Not only that but if you continue getting high the girlfriend or boyfriend definitely isn’t going to stay around for very long. “What about my apartment? How will I pay rent?” How are you...

Is Being in Recovery Boring?

Recovery to those who have never experienced it can seem like the beginning of a dull and boring life. Drugs and alcohol are what makes going out fun. Plus in today’s world it seems like all there is to do has to include some form of intoxication, mainly drinking. Well, we are here to tell you that isn’t the case; you do have something to look forward to after detox and treatment. Trust us, if being in recovery wasn’t fun, we wouldn’t do it. Why would we? So here are some cool things we have already done or want to do in recovery. You can use these ideas to inspire yourself to get through those last few days in detox or treatment. If you are already starting your own list you can use some of our ideas to inspire some more of your own. If you haven’t started a list we suggest you get to it! Recovery isn’t boring when you’re doing adrenalin filled activities. Here are some things we now have money and time for that get your blood pumping! Recovery is far from boring jumping 15,000 ft out of perfectly good airplane. Recovery isn’t boring mountain biking in the desert or at your favorite landmarks. Recovery is amazing zip lining in Costa Rica. Recovery is pure bliss when you’re reeling in a 30 pound dolphin (Mahi Mahi.) Scuba diving is a really awesome experience and something you can do forever if you get certified. Kayaking, mountain climbing, skateboarding, surfing, snowboarding, skiing, running a marathon, attempting an obstacle run, a mud run, or become a tri-athlete. Not into...

The Comedic Truth About Detox

The truth about detox is what you don’t hear in the day-to-day run down of withdrawal. Detox a lot of the times is ridiculously emotional, full of insane laughter, and days where all you do is sleep.  Detox isn’t easy but it is most definitely something that anyone wanting to get better can overcome. In fact, the majority of us who did get better went through it ourselves. Here is the truth about detox: You’ll Love Cakes As Much as A Fat Kid Loves, Well, Cake No seriously you will crave the sweets. The cupcakes, the muffins, the sugary sweet cereals, the cakes, the pies, the candy bars, and the blow pops. You may be a salty kind of person so you may crave the salty stuff too but chances are, especially if you are coming off the opiates, you will love eating everything SWEET. And that is totally fine, because it means you are slowly getting better. If You Love Cake Too Much You May Become The Fat Kid We all know the fat kid loves cake, and take heed of that. If you gorge on the sweet stuff too much and don’t think about your future self later on down the road you will get fat. No really. You most likely aren’t naturally skinny—sorry not sorry. You just have been on a diet of drugs for a while. Your body thinks it has been in a famine, and now that you are eating food again it will store as much fat as it can from what you’re eating just incase you decide to starve it again. Get...

Common Misconceptions About Drug Detox

I woke up to blinding fluorescent lights. My body ached and I couldn’t remember where I was or what had happened in the past 48 hours. As I slowly blinked myself into consciousness I tried to lift my arms to shade my eyes and they stopped short before I could lift them even an inch. My arms were strapped down. Panic hit me. Where the hell am I? I tried to sit up and I couldn’t. It was cold in here. I lifted my head as far up as it would go and looked down at my body. I was strapped down to a hospital bed, in an all white room, with an IV in my arm. What the hell happened last night? Doctors walked in muttering amongst themselves and I knew, just knew that I must have lost my mind somehow. They were talking about electroshock therapy and keeping me in this bed for at least two weeks. Oh my god, oh my god. I started to freak out, to struggle against the binding that was holding me down. It was hopeless. My heart raced, my breathing picked up and I thought “I am never getting out of here!” At that moment the doctor’s walked over and started saying something about sedating me. “No! No! Sedation.” Pause here. This is often times what many of us picture when we think about going to detox. We picture white padded rooms, lock down facilities, strapped to the bed, being injected with drugs, and being treated like crazy people or being around crazy people who are drooling on themselves. Think “One...

To The Siblings Of Addicts

I have written numerous articles on the parents of addicts and on the addicts themselves. Whether it is about a parent losing a drug addicted child, or about the addict’s effect on their family, I am always writing about the parents or the drug addicted individual. I have yet to tell a story, to write an article for the siblings. Which surprises me. Why? I have a younger brother and a younger sister. The effect that both my addiction and my recovery has had on them, has been profound. Yet, it isn’t a topic talked about much by me or any other addiction related site. Well it’s time. So, here we go. This is in honor of my brother and sister, and all the brothers and sisters of every drug addict. You aren’t forgotten. Siblings Have a Very Strong Bond The relationships we have with our siblings is different than a parent/child relationship, obviously. Our siblings have more a friend or role model kind of relationship with us. They also tend to be the first to notice when something is up with us (the drug addicted.) Often times if we are honest with anyone in our family it is our siblings first. For instance, my brother knew what I was doing long before my parents. Siblings are also impacted just as much as the parents, just in different ways. This is especially true if the addiction ends in death. And luckily, people are starting to notice. Both nationally and locally, there is a growing focus on the emotional needs of the non-addicted siblings in families dealing with substance abuse....

Stabilization is the Goal of Drug Detox

All across the country in rural areas, small towns and our cities, we are grappling with the menace that is drug abuse and addiction. Its effects are being seen everywhere from accidents that are drug and alcohol related to drug-related crime, broken marriages, ruined families and lost jobs as a result of substance abuse. Where should these people turn to for help? When jobs are lost and families broken what is the first step to take? The first step is for one to admit that they are sick and need help to be healed. Denial makes the addiction even harder to fight. The myriad of drugs that people are taking have required that the regimes of treatment vary. The drug detox centers in Florida deal with people who have varied addictions to many substances. You can find drug detox such as: Heroin Buprenorphine Duragesic Morphine Opana Percocet Lorcet Methadone Fentanyl Dilaudid Hydrocodone Lortab Oxycodone Oxycontin Roxycodone Alcohol Subutex Suboxone Tramadol Vicodin Ambien Cocaine Ativan Benzodiazepine Klonopin Xanax The process of removing any of the above harmful substances from the body in drug detox centers in Florida is one that is done carefully and with medical supervision. The ceasing of taking any of the substances obviously has its side effects, as the craving intensity increases and the body experiences physical withdrawal symptoms, which may range from uncomfortable to mild or even very severe symptoms. Anxiety, shallow breathing, diarrhea, muscle jerks, bone and muscle pains, are just some of the effects of stopping the use of drugs or alcohol and all these symptoms have to be handled in such a way...

The Price Of Life Just Went Up

Naloxone, the life saving drug for those in the midst of a heroin overdose, was once a cheap drug. While it isn’t entirely available to everyone, it has become more and more widespread. As the life-saving drug has become more accessible, the price has spiked. This price hike has many people worried that something that is literally touted as a miracle drug will soon become out of reach. Naloxone can literally reverse the effects of a heroin overdose, saving someone who would of otherwise been dead. So the price spike is scary. It means less of it in the hands of first responders, friends, and family members which means less lives saved. Just How Much Have Naloxone Prices Spiked? So how much is the price spike? Prices are jumping by 50% or more. In Georgia, police saw kits with the drug go from $22 to $40. Naloxone has always been subject to dramatic fluctuations in price and availability, restricting access for cash-strapped community organizations who distribute the drug across the U.S. The reasons for the volatility have always been complex and frustratingly opaque. But it may be from lack of competition: Only two companies, Amphastar, which makes a nasal spray, and Hospira, which makes an injectable, manufacture the drug. But demand for the drug is also going up: The latest price hike coincides with the proliferation of its distribution through police forces and community health programs. New policies across the country have put the Naloxone nasal spray into the hands of police officers to administer it to people overdosing. Recently passed laws in states like Pennsylvania and North Carolina...

Enabling An Addict – And How To Stop

Often times when you try to help an addict or alcoholic you are actually making it easier for them to continue on abusing drugs and drink. It is one of the most confusing things for parents and friends to understand and it is called enabling. Enabling an addict can take on many different forms, but all in all it allows them to avoid the consequences of their harmful actions. Enabling Defined The best way to describe enabling is to look at how it is different from helping. Helping is doing something for someone that they are not capable of doing themselves. Enabling is doing something for someone that they could or should be doing themselves. For example, paying rent or handling financial problems. Often time the addict or alcoholic in your life will ask for help financially because they have spent all their money on drugs or alcohol. Whatever they are asking for money for, they should and could be paying for whatever it is on their own. So if you pay for anything or give them money you are actually enabling them to continue on using instead of dealing with consequences of their addiction. They could and should pay their rent, buy dinner, court costs etc. You are enabling if you are the bank for your addicted love one. If you are loaning out money, paying for anything or giving them money in any way then you most likely are enabling.   You cover for them. If you are calling their work for them or their school, you are enabling.   You bail them out of jail. This...

Breaking The Stigma: Disease of Addiction

Addiction for a long time was stigmatized as a moral failing. Addicts and alcoholics were thought to just be bad people. Today though, we know the opposite is true. While many addict and alcoholic’s choice seem to make them bad people what they are is suffering from a disease not a lack of morals. The stigmas of addicts and alcoholics being bad people still follows them around regardless of this knowledge but it is slowly being broken. Addiction is a Disease In the days before addiction was considered a disease, our society was very prejudiced towards people with addictions. Addicts were seen as different and less than “normal” people. Addicts were thought to have low discipline and morals. Addicts were seen as self-centered and uncaring. They also were seen as people who were out for themselves without any regard for anyone else. When the idea that addiction was a disease cam about, people started to realize that addicts weren’t bad people, they were actually sick people. This changed everything moving forward. Of course it wasn’t totally a good thing to hear certain people were suffering from another type of disease but it was better than being morally judged and deemed self-centered. The Science Behind Addiction as a Disease Drug addiction shares many features with other chronic illnesses including a tendency to run in families (genetic), an onset and course that can be influenced by environment and behavior, and the ability to respond to appropriate treatment which may or may not include long-term lifestyle changes. You can think of addiction much like other chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes...

Three Sobering Facts About Opiate Withdrawal

Unfortunately many people find out too late that opiate drug abuse leads to a physical dependence. And once this physical dependence from opiate drug abuse happens there is no way around experiencing the withdrawal if you want to stop. If you want to stop abusing painkillers, oxys or heroin, but are afraid of withdrawal – don’t worry. Every single one of us who is sober today has experienced that same fear.  It is okay to be afraid and it is also totally normal. You are not alone. Here are some things that may set your mind at ease about drug opiate withdrawal: 1. Opiate Withdrawal (for the most part) Won’t Kill You Often times it may feel like you are going to die from the drug withdrawal you are experiencing when you quit using opiates. In fact, this feeling is what you are probably afraid of. No one wants to feel as crappy as they do when they stop taking drugs and alcohol. But working through these negative symptoms is absolutely essential to you taking the next step towards never feeling this way again. Any kind of drug withdrawal aside from alcohol and benzodiazepine withdrawal is not fatal. This means that while you may “feel” like dying, you won’t. Many people have been through this before you and many people will go through it after you. Hang on tight and surround yourself with people who will support you during this time and you have no reason to be afraid of withdrawal. If you are really terrified of withdrawal you may want to seek help from a detox center that is designed...

A Complete Guide To Alcohol, Opiate and Benzo Withdrawal

So listen, withdrawal symptoms, they aren’t pleasant. I think we all already knew that. If withdrawal symptoms were manageable there wouldn’t be the innumerable amount of detoxes all over the country specifically built for dealing with them. But that isn’t what we are here to talk about; we are here to talk about the details of withdrawal symptoms. So you know you get sick when you stop taking your prescription medication, your alcohol or your painkillers–do you know why? Do you know how? There are multiple substances that can cause withdrawal symptoms; they are basically every drug on the face on the planet, yes-even alcohol. In fact, alcohol produces some of the worst withdrawal symptoms ever–so bad in fact that they can be potentially fatal depending on their severity. So what is going on in your body to cause this reaction? It isn’t a coincidence that you get super sick when you stop using substances; your body is reacting, sometimes violently. Here is a breakdown of the withdrawal symptoms for the major substances and why they happen: Alcohol Effects and Withdrawal Symptoms What does it do? Slows down thoughts, reflexes and actions Altered perception Mood-altering Disinhibiting Effects On Your Body: Cardiovascular Liver and kidney disease Inflammatory to the GI tract Neuropathy Psychological disorders The Withdrawal Symptoms: Seizures Anxiety or depression Hallucinations, delirium Tremors Heart attacks, strokes Can be life-threatening How and Why? Heavy, prolonged drinking — especially excessive daily drinking — disrupts the brain’s neurotransmitters, the brain chemicals that transmit messages. When heavy drinkers suddenly stop or significantly reduce their alcohol consumption, the neurotransmitters previously suppressed by alcohol are no longer suppressed....

The Truth About Alcohol Withdrawal

Alcohol. It’s socially acceptable. It is something most of the world has done well before the legal drinking age here in the United States. Commercials of the stuff are on TV and they promise so much. They promise clubs, beautiful women, glitter, and gold. But the truth looks nothing like that. The truth is alcohol can be ugly. Alcohol is the snake in the grass. It is the one substance that creeps up on you. Alcoholics probably, after a certain point, can see it coming, but they can’t picture the way that alcohol will become a part of them. Physically (penetrating every cell), emotionally, and spiritually. Their liquid courage, their social lubricant, their comfort after a long day suddenly becomes the thing that is killing them quicker than anything else. Drinking? Eventually it turns against you. It’s so captivating and so imprisoning, that for some, without the help of a hospital or a medical detox facility they are safer continuing to do the one thing that is killing them rather than stopping. What is that? Drinking. If you are physically addicted to alcohol chances are your better off if you continue drinking rather than trying to stop on your own. Why? Because alcohol withdrawal symptoms, they can kill you. Alcohol is a subtle foe. It is a deadly one. It is the one that asks you every morning to continue to poison yourself or risk the shakes, the sweats, the seizures and hallucinations. This is alcohol withdrawal. And for the alcoholic, it isn’t a choice to go cold turkey–it is dangerous to go cold turkey. Get outside help. Symptoms...

The Five Most Commonly Abused OTC Drugs

Is your medicine cabinet full of drugs that teenagers can abuse?  Over the counter medications, or OTC drugs, can be just as dangerous as prescriptions medications, and they are much easier to obtain.  They also tend to be less expensive which makes them more accessible to teenagers.  Abuse of OTC drugs is most common in teens between 13 and 16 years of age.  Teens are old enough to know what they are doing and old enough to understand the dangers of any kind of drug addiction.  Teens who are rifling through the medicine cabinet for options are also likely to pair over the counter medications with alcohol or illegal drugs which makes them even more dangerous. Take a look through your medicine cabinet for some of the most commonly abused OTC drugs of addiction that include: Pain Relievers Ibuprofen and acetaminophen, more commonly known as big brands Advil and Tylenol, are very common in most medicine cabinets.  Large doses of either can cause symptoms like liver damage, kidney failure, and stomach bleeding.  When taken in large doses over a longer period of time, they can cause a heightened risk of cardiac arrest.  Teens will take a higher dose of a pain reliever trying to relieve pain faster or trying to get rid of a little bit of pain with a lot of medication. Diet Pills The abuse of diet pills usually starts with a teen who simply wants to lose some weight.  While this is not the greatest way for a teenager to go about losing weight, it still happens.  Over the counter diet pills can be highly addictive. ...

Three Things to Do Before Drug Detox

Making the decision to get into drug detox can be very scary.  Heading into the unknown always is.  You do not know quite what you are going to go through, so how do you prepare before drug detox? You do not know what withdrawal is going to be like or what you are going to have to deal with in the therapy that follows.  Your whole life is going to be different than it was before. Committing to drug detox is one of the best decisions that you can make regardless of your fears about it.  If you are suffering from an addiction, a big change in your life may be just what you need.  When you are prepping to take on this rehab journey, there are a few things that you should keep in mind – things to do or not do – so that you can be in the best possible state for getting your addiction under control. 1. Take Care of Yourself Your body is going to be under quite a lot of stress in the first bit of your detox treatment.  Withdrawal symptoms can be difficult.  Some common withdrawal symptoms include excessive sweating, insomnia, anxiety, irritability, headache, shaking, and difficulty concentrating.  To get your body prepared for these kinds of difficulties, get some more rest than you have been getting.  Go to bed early and sleep until you wake up naturally.  Get some exercise.  A little bit of exercise will get your blood moving and make it easier for you to get better rest.  And eat healthier foods.  In rehab, you will be encouraged to...

Seven Ways to Help Yourself Get Through Heroin Withdrawal

Ask most people what they know about heroin withdrawal, and they will tell you that it is terrifying and terrible.  There are lots of stories out there about how terrible withdrawal is and how painful the whole things is.  Fear of withdrawal is one of the biggest things that keeps people who need to get help for addiction from getting the help that they need.  The first thing to remember is that withdrawal is going to be different for everyone.  Your symptoms are not going to be the same as anyone else you talk to.  There are some typical symptoms such as excessive sweating, general aches and pains, a bit of nausea, and insomnia that most people in withdrawal experience, but there are some things that you can do to help yourself make it through without too much difficulty. 1.  Find Ways to Distract Yourself Distraction can be very important when you are going through active withdrawal from a heroin addiction.  Focusing on your symptoms can really intensify them so finding something else to think about can be useful.  Read a book about something other than addiction, watch a movie that will make you laugh, or talk to a friend about something other than your recovery.  2.  Remember that Withdrawal Does Not Last Forever Withdrawal symptoms will not last indefinitely.  They will usually ease in less than two weeks.  You may experience some cravings as you move further from your last heroin dose, but the bulk of your withdrawal symptoms will go away fairly quickly.  Keeping in mind that this part will not last forever can be a big...

Seven Tips to Prevent Relapse

About 570,000 people die annually from drug use.  Many of these people have had substance abuse problems for a long time.  Many have even gone through addiction recovery programs.  Substance abusers and addicts learn in rehab that addiction is something that they will work on dealing with for a good portion of their lives.  The battle to prevent relapse begins immediately after you leave the safety of an addiction treatment program.  Having a strong relapse prevention plan can really help you in your battle to stay clean and sober after rehab. 1. Watch for Triggers Your triggers are the things that make you want to take drugs or drink alcohol.  They can be people or places or things that make you want to go back to your actively addicted life.  You will need to be watchful of triggers. You can make a plan for what to do when you encounter your triggers.  Having a plan about what to do when you encounter a trigger situation can take away the fear and the anxiety surrounding the situation.  2. Create a Support Network There are many different kinds of support for people after they are finished with rehab.  Many of these organizations are based around living a sober life.  One of the most common ways for people in recovery to get support is to go to a recovery meeting.  There are a number of different kinds of recovery meetings such as 12-step meetings, religion based meetings, family groups, or secular community meetings.  Some groups are for specific demographics such as women, gay men, teens, or specific professions.  All of these meetings...

Five Specific Reasons to Get Help For Substance Abuse

So you have a substance abuse problem.  You have probably had it for a while.  And you keep thinking about doing something about it.  You may have thought about how much money drug and alcohol are costing you, or how much your substance abuse is effecting your personal life.  And then you may have thought about how hard it is going to be to quit and all of the stories you hear about people suffering.  If you have a substance abuse problem and you sometimes think about giving it all up to go to rehab, you will probably be able to come up with many, many reasons why you do not want to quit.  There are, however, many, many more reasons why you should get help for substance abuse, quit doing drugs and drinking – and take back control of your life.  1.  Your Memory Will Improve When your brain is not being fed foreign chemicals and toxins, it will be better able to process the situations at hand.  Once you are better able to process, your brain will be more apt to remember things that are important.  Once you are better able to remember, you will be better equipped to be responsible and let people count on you.  When you are high much of the time, it is difficult to commit anything to long term memory which can mean that whole parts of your life are going to be missing when you look back.  When you make the commitment to get help for substance abuse, you will have a whole new life of memories to build. 2.  Your...

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